FAQ's

I LIVE IN ANOTHER STATE; CAN I STILL ADOPT FROM YOU?

 

Yes you can! As long as you’re a good match and can provide a safe, loving, appropriate home for your new pet, we will allow you to adopt no matter what state you live in.

 

We do ask that you meet the animal in person before committing. We may elect to ask someone from a rescue group in your area to perform a home check before approving your adoption.

 

Virginia law stipulates that municipal shelters or impound facilities may only adopt animals to residents of the county in which it is located or of a contiguous county. If you are interested in one of Floyd’s beautiful pound pooches we would be delighted to facilitate your adoption.

 

WHERE IS YOUR SHELTER?

 

The Floyd County Humane Society is a foster-based organization, so we do not have any central office or location. Our animals live at the homes of our members around the county. Once you have selected which animal you would like to meet, arrangements are made directly with the member who is fostering that animal.

 

Our dogs are usually featured at the Christiansburg PetSmart on the fourth Saturday of every month, and cats are often featured there as well.

 

Watch our calendar for when and where we’ll be!

 

WE’VE FALLEN IN LOVE WITH A PET; HOW DO WE ADOPT?

 

First, fill out an application. Once you submit your application, we will contact you to discuss which pet might be a good match.

We will call your references and we may perform a home check. A home check isn’t about your housekeeping, but to determine whether the animal can be safe and happy with you. For example, we may look to see if your pet will have a secure place to play outside.

Our foster families will do their best to help you visit your chosen pet, get to know their quirks, and decide which animal is right for you. A typical adoption takes one to two weeks.

 

WHAT IF IT DOESN’T WORK OUT?

 

Sometimes this happens.

 

People sometimes overestimate their ability to deal with behavior issues. Animals can change a little (or a lot) when they get comfortable. Your dog that loved his new playmate when they met briefly at PetSmart may not get along well when the new dog moves home. A cat may become reclusive.

 

Whatever the issue is, your first option is to call us for help and advice. Many big issues have simple fixes.

An adoption isn’t considered final until you have had your pet for two weeks. We know how common it is to realize an animal will be too much, only after you’ve gotten them home. We’ll take them back and return your check, but we’ll also ask lots of questions so that we can make a better match next time.

 

If you decide your pet isn’t fitting in after the 14 day trial period, you can still return them to us. Please be aware that the process may take time while we arrange a foster home, and that your adoption fee is nonrefundable after the trial period.

 

WHY DO I HAVE TO PAY TO ADOPT AN ANIMAL THAT NEEDS A HOME?

 

The fees we charge are kept as low as possible so that area residents can afford to adopt, but we do have to charge some fees to cover some of the costs of caring for our animals. If an animal is adopted quickly we just about break even on veterinary costs, because veterinarians give us generous discounts. Most animals end up costing the Society more than their adoption fee; the pre-adoption veterinary care alone can easily reach $300 – $500.

 

WHY DOES MY NEW PET HAVE TO BE SPAYED OR NEUTERED BEFORE ADOPTION?

 

Virginia state law requires that all animals adopted out by “releasing agencies,” such as municipal shelters and private rescue groups, are spayed or neutered within 30 days of adoption. Most rescue groups do this before the animal is even put up for adoption, while municipal shelters may have you sign a contract to get the surgery done within thirty days.

 

Spaying and neutering does not make animals fat and lazy, harm their health, or change their personalities. Spaying not only reduces the stress and discomfort females endure during heat periods, but also eliminates the risk of uterine cancer and reduces the chance of mammary cancer. Males who are neutered are far less likely to roam or fight, and are no longer at risk for testicular cancer.

 

By spaying/neutering an animal, you are helping to alleviate the dog and cat overpopulation problem. Each year, millions of unwanted dogs and cats are euthanized at shelters across the country. Many orphans suffer due to accidental breeding by free-roaming, unaltered pets. By spaying/neutering our pets, we reduce the tragedy and cost of euthanization.

 

All age-appropriate animals adopted through the Floyd County Humane Society are altered before adoption, and the adoption fee includes the cost of the surgery.