Foster

Become a Foster Volunteer

Save a Life!  

 

Your act of kindness is repaid in rewards that are beyond words.

Fostering is an immensely rewarding experience, and it changes animals’ lives in a very direct way. Through Floyd County Humane Society’s foster program, many animals have received family care before getting a second chance at life. Often dogs and cats who come to FCHS need foster care before they are ready to find new homes, and this need continues to increase. 

Foster Form

If you have questions about becoming a foster please Contact us today!

Foster Wish List

 

Foster volunteers provide: 

Loving family environment, care for animals who require supportive health care or post-surgery recovery, & socialization for the vast overflow of cats, kittens, dogs, and puppies.

Foster families are only responsible for providing a loving home environment and sending pictures and family updates to help find forever homes. The food, medication, kennels, toys, and other basic supplies you will need are provided, along with training and care instructions and access.

 

Foster a Dog or Cat

Fostering is simply nurturing a rescued pet in your home for a period of time. The majority of our fostered dogs are from the Floyd County Pound or owner surrendered. They need the security of a loving home, and sometimes may need special care and attention.  Our municipal pound does not allow cats or kittens, so their lives depend entirely on us.  FCHS often receives requests to care for abandoned litters of kittens who would benefit from foster care.

 

That's where you come in. Just like kids, dogs and cats learn to get along with each other by playing. They learn limits, they learn tolerance, and they learn not to hurt each other. This interaction is essential for the healthy development of family dogs and cats. Fostered dogs and cats also learn about the home environment — other cats, other dogs, and kids. When they are ready for adoption, they are often the most outgoing, confident animals from the shelter.

 

Other animals that may need fostering are animals recovering from surgery, or those that for some reason need time in a home before being adopted. This is particularly true of some of the dogs that come in and haven't truly been part of a "family".

Some dogs just benefit from getting out of the kennel for a "sleepover", or a weekend break, even a day hike. You can help make a difference in the life of a shelter animal — and have a lot of fun, too!

In terms of commitment, the length of time an animal is in a foster home is entirely based on the individual foster, or the length of time it takes for the dog or cat to be adopted. Animals can be fostered anywhere from two weeks, to a few months, and occasionally, a year or more. It is all based on the animal and your desired level of commitment.  Weekend sleepovers or day hikes can provide important stress reduction and social skills for dogs and only require a few hours to a few days of commitment. 

Foster parents are individuals too, and while one family may foster one or two dogs or cats in a year, another may take on a “hospice” dog or cat for an undetermined amount of time. All of your time spent caring for foster dogs and cats is valued more than we can say. You help us save lives!